Tonight at The Last Bookstore: Melville House (AWP Off-Site)

March 31st, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

7:30 – 9PM

453 S Spring St – Ground Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013

The Last Bookstore is pleased to present Melville House Night, featuring authors Christopher Boucher, Jeremy Bushnell, Catie Disabato, and Kirk Lynn, and translator Edward Gauvin. Come join us to hear them read from their latest books.

CHRISTOPHER BOUCHER teaches writing and literature at Boston College, and is the managing editor of Post Road Magazine. He is the author of How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive, and the forthcoming novel Golden Delicious.

JEREMY P. BUSHNELL is the author of The Weirdness, and the forthcoming novel The Insides. He teaches writing at Northeastern University in Boston and lives in Dedham, Massachusetts.

CATIE DISABATO is the author of The Ghost Network. She is a columnist for Full Stop and has written criticism and commentary for This Recording, The Millions, and The Rumpus.

KIRK LYNN is the head of the Playwriting and Directing Area in the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of Texas at Austin, is one of six coproducing artistic directors of Rude Mechanicals theater collective. He is the author of Rules for Werewolves.

EDWARD GAUVIN is a translator from the French. His work has won multiple prizes and has appeared in the New York Times, Tin House, Subtropics, World Literature Today, and Weird Fiction Review. The translator of more than two hundred graphic novels, Gauvin is a contributing editor for comics at Words Without Borders. His translation of Serge Brussolo’s The Deep Sea Diver’s Syndrome marked the first English-language publication of the French master of the fantastic.

Tomorrow at AWP 2016: Los Angeles

March 30th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

R230. The Translator as Coauthor: Collaborative Translation

Room 513, LA Convention Center, Meeting Room Level
Thursday, March 31, 2016
1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

When translators and authors collaborate, we often assume that the translation replicates the original. Yet the results often differ not only in the obvious linguistic ways, but also in content, organization, and even plot, as writers take opportunities to revise and translators both render and rewrite the evolving text. Four translators discuss their experiences in working with their authors to bring their works into English, and the creative strategies involved in collaboration.

Moderator:Susan Harris is the editorial director of Words without Borders and the coeditor, with Ilya Kaminsky, of The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry.

Edward Gauvin’s translations have appeared in the New York TimesTin House,SubtropicsConjunctionsPEN AmericaWords Without Borders, the Southern Review, the Harvard Review, and World Literature Today. As H.V. Chao, he has published fiction in the Kenyon ReviewBirkensnake, and West Branch.

Shabnam Nadiya has an MFA from and is the 2013–14 Schulze Fellow at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She is currently working on a collection of linked stories calledPariah Dog and Others.

Kareem James Abu-Zeid is a freelance writer, editor, and translator (of Arabic, German, and French). He is currently writing a history of psychedelic literature and wrapping up his PhD. His recent translations include novels and collections of poetry from Iraq, Palestine, Lebanon, and Sudan.

Karen Emmerich is a translator of modern Greek poetry and prose. She has a PhD in comparative literature from Columbia University and is on the faculty of Princeton University.

NOW OUT: Paris, Etc.

March 29th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Paris etc

Editor Jessie Vail Aufiery’s labor of extraordinary love is now out from Serving House Press, and available on Amazon! Featuring, I’m proud to say, my translations of the essay “Paris” by Julien Green and an excerpt, “The Bawdyhouse for Beggars,” from Jean-Paul Clébert’s Paris insolite, forthcoming in Donald Nicholson-Smith’s translation as Paris Vagabond from New York Review Books. The Clébert piece previously appeared in the Le Carré issue of The Literary Review and Harper’s.

An anthology of poems, stories and essays that explore what Paris means to writers who have visited and lived in this fascinating city. These are works that are jubilant, despondent, flippant, stuck, liberated, devastated, bored, solitary, joyous, in love–that explore, in short, a wide rambling space that is not just tragedy or fantasy, but all the life that happens in between.

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